info@kabukistrength.com | 503-974-0222

The Duffalo Bar Can Be An Offensive Lineman’s Best Friend

The Duffalo Bar Can Be An Offensive Lineman’s Best Friend

by Rudy Kadlub January 05, 2023

Rudy Kadlub (the writer) is Co-Owner and CEO of Kabuki Strength and is an active competitive powerlifter. Since beginning his powerlifting career twelve years ago at age 55 he has set 25 American and 24 World records.

Jacob Lonowski is currently the Head Strength & Conditioning Coach for Olympic Sports at Georgia State University where he trains Softball, Baseball and Women’s Track & Field. While playing football at Georgia Tech he earned his Bachelor of Science in Business Management with a Specialization in Information Technology Management and then his Master’s of Science from Georgia State University in Exercise Science with a Specialization in Exercise Physiology. Also, he is certified by the NSCA as a CSCS and by the CSCCa as a SCCC. It is best to reach him through email at jlonowski@gsu.edu, he always very eager to learn & share.

Chris Duffin and I recently attended the Collegiate Strength and Conditioning Coaches annual convention in Fort Worth, Texas and while there we had a chance to meet several coaches from around the country and demonstrate the features and benefits of some of our patented products. As a former collegiate offensive line coach myself, it occurred to me while talking to Georgia State Strength Coach Jacob Lonowski, an offensive line alum of Georgia Tech, that the unique properties of the Duffalo Bar produced by our company, Kabuki Strength, can have specific practical benefits in the strength training for offensive linemen in football. 

The Duffalo Bar’s proprietary bend allows for improved positioning of the shoulder joint in the glenoid (socket), increasing power transfer through the joint and reducing the risk of injury that comes with handling huge loads with sub-optimal joint positioning. In addition to this improved joint centration and the cued scapular retraction & depression (a more stable and safe position for pressing) provided by the Duffalo Bar, there is an increase in the range of motion of the pressing movement. The result of which is training a deeper pressing position in relationship to the shoulder which strengthens a typically compromised position for an offensive lineman.  The four-inch drop provided by the proprietary bends in the Duffalo Bar vs. a straight bar provides this advantage.

In close contact play for offensive linemen, better developing strength through these increased ranges of motion will contribute to increased position-specific performance and a more resilient shoulder. Getting more comfortable with a deeper and coiled shoulder position gives the arm increased time in which to accelerate. This correlates to a greater wind up leading to faster hands and more powerful strikes. With stronger shoulders comes healthier linemen who can more easily overpower during the run game, and agile impactful strikes give linemen an even better chance of adapting and countering the moves of defensive linemen during the passing game.

Shoulder injuries can occur when athletes internally rotate their shoulders during high effort bench pressing. Because of its unique curvature, The Duffalo Bar not only cues shoulder external rotation but forces this safer and stronger pressing position. Any improvements in this regard will help increase the longevity of a lineman’s career and help even up the odds in “the pits”.

The Duffalo Bar can be purchased on our website and we encourage you to read the product page for more detailed information on its features and function. The Duffalo Bar is manufactured in the USA using American Steel and hand-assembled.




Rudy Kadlub
Rudy Kadlub

Author




Also in Articles and Education

Training Should Be Corrective and Rehabilitative
Training Should Be Corrective and Rehabilitative

by Daniel DeBrocke January 09, 2023

A common problem is the neglect lifters have toward their orthopedic health. At least until they become injured and are forced to address it. Unfortunately, they turn to theraguns, foam rolling, static stretching, and other approaches that often do little to move the needle. What people often get wrong is their training should simultaneously enhance their performance and address their long term health. In this article I’ll cover how to effectively incorporate corrective work into your training (and no, I’m not talking about spending an hour using therabands). 

Read More

The Men’s Mental Health Crisis
The Men’s Mental Health Crisis

by Daniel DeBrocke January 06, 2023

The writing of this article was prompted by all the social media posts I’ve seen talking about men’s mental health. Apparently November is men’s mental health month. That is unless you’re struggling with your own mental health issues. Then, every month, week, and day may very well be an ongoing struggle. Although throughout this article I’ll be referencing comparative data between men and women and differing demographics, the point is not to prop up men's suffering above women or anyone else for that matter. It’s simply there to elucidate the current state of men’s mental health, which is the central focus of this article. “Einstein is quoted as having said that if he had one hour to save the world he would spend fifty-five minutes defining the problem and only five minutes finding the solution” (1). This mentality exists in contrast to the current lack of awareness pertaining to the drivers of psychological ill-health. Social media and articles routinely discuss what to do if you’re depressed, anxious, suicidal, etc. But seldom does anyone discuss the complexity of the subject. Unfortunately, without truly understanding the issues that lead to ill-health it’s unlikely to come up with an effective solution and subsequent prevention strategies. Therefore the aim of this article is as follows:

Read More

Is Full Range Of Motion Actually Better For Muscle Growth?
Is Full Range Of Motion Actually Better For Muscle Growth?

by Daniel DeBrocke January 06, 2023

Optimizing exercise range of motion to maximize muscle growth is a popular topic to discuss. As new research emerges, it often leaves you with more questions about the fundamental mechanisms and application of hypertrophy training. Mechanical tension is known as a primary driver of hypertrophy. Therefore it stands to reason that training a muscle through larger ranges of motion will create more tension, resulting in a greater hypertrophic stimulus. Although this makes sense at face value, it’s ultimately an unsatisfactory answer. At deeper levels of analysis, mechanical tension alone (or at least our current model) can not explain some of the observed outcomes we see both in the literature and anecdotally. The aim of this article is to provide a brief review of the topic, provide context to the ROM discussion, and offer practical recommendations to implement into your own training. 

Read More